Position Statements

Food and Drug Administration
In 2010, the FDA issued a proposed rule to authorize a health claim regarding the relationship between plant sterols and stanols and the reduction of the risk of coronary heart disease. The rule suggests that daily intake of at least two grams of phytosterols is necessary to justify the coronary heart disease reduction claim.

For more information from the Food and Drug Administration’s proposed amended health claim and position on plant sterols, visit http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-30386.pdf


National Cholesterol Education Program
According to a 2002 report from the National Cholesterol Education Program, consuming foods rich in plant sterols can help lower LDL levels, as part of an eating plan already low in saturated fat and cholesterol and high in fiber.

For more information from the National Cholesterol Education Program’s position on plant sterols, visit http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3full.pdf (see pg. V-13).


American Heart Association
According to an American Heart Association 2001 position statement, foods containing plant sterols can be consumed by adults that are at high risk of or have had a heart attack and are looking to lower their LDL cholesterol levels.

For more information from the American Heart Association’s position on plant sterols, visit: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/103/8/1177.full


American Diabetes Association
The American Diabetes Association provides evidence-based nutrition recommendations for the prevention and management of diabetes. In 2008, the organization stated that approximately 2 grams per day of plant sterols and stanols has been shown to lower LDL cholesterol levels in healthy individuals and in those living with type 2 diabetes.

For more information from the American Diabetes Association’s position on plant sterols, visit http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/31/Supplement_1/S61.full